Gregory Roth

Seattle, USA

Gregory A. Roth is Assistant Professor in the Division of Cardiology at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Metrics Sciences and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME). After completing his medical studies at Brown University and his MPH in Epidemiology from the University of Washington, Dr Roth trained in internal medicine and cardiovascular diseases at the University of Washington, and was an attending physician at Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, and a consultant physician at Whakatane Hospital, New Zealand. He received additional training as a postdoctoral fellow with the Veterans Administration Health Services Research and Development branch. At IHME, he leads cardiovascular disease modelling for the institute’s landmark Global Burden of Disease Study. Dr Roth’s research focuses on global cardiovascular health surveillance, population health, and quality of care and outcomes for cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure. He is an Associate Editor of Global Heart, the journal of the World Heart Federation.


Monday 01 June 08:30

Global perspectives of cardiovascular disease, and impact of risk factors

The Global Burden of Disease Study, established over two decades ago, estimates disability and death from a multitude of causes worldwide. The study has clearly shown that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major contributor to the escalating 21st century pandemic of non-communicable chronic disease, responsible for nearly two-thirds of all global deaths. Indeed, much of the continuing burden from CVD has shifted to low- and middle-income countries, due to sociodemographic transition in these regions. However, it is also recognised that with the ongoing global epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes, CVD mortality rates have plateaued and are no longer declining for high-income regions.  These trends underline the importance of increased investment in prevention and treatment of CVD for all regions of the world.

Integration of data relating to incidence, prevalence, and mortality has established poor diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use and excessive alcohol use as key contributors to CVD, via their association with hypertension, hyperglycaemia, hypercholesterolaemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, the Global Burden of Disease Study has been instrumental in identifying other risk factors that are precursors of CVD.  

The Global Burden of Disease study provides a novel platform for tracking changes in CVD epidemiology linked to demographic and socioeconomic change. Findings from the study will be critical to improving health systems to reduce or eliminate disparities in CVD prevention across the globe. 

Key references

Thomas H, Diamond J, Vieco A, Chaudhuri S, Shinnar E, Cromer S, Perel P, Mensah GA, Narula J, Johnson CO, Roth GA, Moran AE. Global Atlas of Cardiovascular Disease 2000-2016: the path to prevention and control. Glob Heart 2018;13:143-63.

Murphy A, Johnson CO, Roth GA, Forouzanfar MH, Naghavi M, Ng M, Pogosova N, Vos T, Murray CJL, Moran AE. Ischaemic heart disease in the former Soviet Union 1990-2015 according to the Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study. Heart 2018;104:58-66.

Prabhakaran D, Singh K, Roth GA, Banerjee A, Pagidipati NJ, Huffman MD.  Cardiovascular diseases in India compared with the United States. J Am Coll Cardiol 2018;72:79-95.